Monschau in the Eifel Mountains, Germany

monschau-in-the-eifel-mountains

The very pretty and old village of Monschau on the river Rur ( without an h). Very cold in the valley but nice where the sun caught. We were expecting to find a Christmas market open that day, but it wasn’t. The village itself was very attractive though, high in the Eifel Mountains, an area of Germany I hadn’t visited before. Very sparkly at this time of year, with the sun on the frost.In fairness I should say that some shops were open, and they were of a high standard, so our visit there was generally enjoyable

I took a lot of reference pictures whilst I was there. The lights and darks were good and the tumbledown buildings would be fun to draw. I haven’t painted German villages before and maybe I will. I tend to paint places that people buy at exhibition, which perhaps is wrong as nothing worse than a bored artist.

In all, our trip to the Christmas markets was not successful. Monschau was lovely, but the Christmas markets in Liege, Belgium the following day were poor, and even in Bruges on the way home, a city so beautiful normally, the markets were disappointing.

But what really marred the trip, apart from the disgusting food in our hotel, was the fact that we both became ill partway through the holiday, and towards the end all we wanted was home. I have no doubt that this jaundiced our view of the trip

I found, when I went to my own doctor,( and at my wife’s insistence), that I had developed bronchitis, so no wonder I had difficulty breathing! Thank heavens for penicillin, and now partway through my course, I am feeling much better, and interested enough to write my blog, which I have neglected.

I have done no more on Bosham Harbour sadly, not having had the will to take up a brush, but now I am looking forward to getting started again

One little ray of sunshine to brighten my gloom this week, was to hear that my charity card, Christmas Shopping in Guildford High Street, which is described somewhere in the archive of this blog, actually sold out. That was 250 packs of ten, so very pleased at that. That in addition to the original painting which I donated as well, which they sold for £150, so delighted about that too

I hope to get back to normal soon

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4 thoughts on “Monschau in the Eifel Mountains, Germany

  1. Honestly Monsieur, you do have spirit to travel like this! It must be applauded.

    I had been waiting to hear from you, even emailed you about a topic and when didn’t receive a response, remembered that you might be in Germany, as you had mentioned once. I hope you are doing better now, and feeling like working again. It’s so amazing that your Christmas cards sold well!

    On another note, remember Monsieur Renaud? The military guy who is translating my story? I had sent him a link of your Camargue horses. He said it’s beautiful (does that need saying?) and he wishes he could paint as you can.

    So all in all, everything is great. Have a good recovery.

    Regards,

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you Farzana. Yes I am very much behind due to ill-health but getting daily stronger.
      I remember I owe you a reply on the subject of Mission Schools. Not a term I have heard in this country for many, many years. They go back to before there was state education, and philanthropists started schools in poor areas where otherwise children had no hope of even a basic education. They considered themselves on a mission, as much as the missionaries who went out to the old empire. That is all the information I have

      Liked by 1 person

      • Thank you Monsieur.
        I had thought missionary schools are found all around the world, especially in western countries. Now that you said, I think it’s right because their mission was to spread education and also, to some extent, Christianity. Fort William and the Missionary of Sreerampur was the first in this subcontinent to take up the role. Their principal was a man called William Kerry (I might have misspelled the name, sorry). You are a man of history. You definitely know better.

        Like

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